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Do I really need therapy if I'm already taking medication?



When it comes to mental health or addiction, there is no one-size-fits-all treatment approach.  Some people respond very well to talk therapy alone, while others may need medication to assist with the process.  When combined with therapy, medication can be an important part of the treatment process.

I emphasize the word "part" because unlike antibiotics, psychotropic medications do not cure the disorder but rather help you to feel better in order to function and fully participate in the process of recovery.  Medication without therapy is like a Band-Aid; it covers the cut, but the cut is still there.  It isn't the Band-Aid that heals the cut but rather the body doing the work of repairing the wound.  Likewise, therapy is the work that is required to heal the wound, and the medication provides cover (alleviates symptoms) to allow you to do the work.

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